Current Term Classes - BIS

Spring 2018

Spring class registration opens on December 1 for BIS students.  

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies may cancel, modify, or make substitutions for any published class or program, may change instructors, and may change the dates and times a class is offered. The information published here and in the catalog is subject to change.  For the most up-to-date and complete information, please use the SIS Class Search.  

BIS students should register in BIS classes. Classes outside of BIS are by permission of your advisor. Other students may register as Community Scholars for BIS classes with program permission. See class details for restrictions.


ISBU 3772: Global Leadership Fundamentals for All Industries
NVCC Alexandria | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Investigates current leadership thinking and behavior in for-profit and non-profit work environments, as well as the role leadership has played in past decision making processes, and what we can learn from the decisions that were made by those leaders.  Examines real world examples throughout this course, leveraging the theory and practical applications of leadership.
Jill Guindon-Nasir | 3 UG credits

ISBU 3840: International Business
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
An introduction to the practice and theory of international business. Consideration given to global trade and economic integration theory; the major instruments and procedures needed for management and operation of an international business; modes of international market entry and foreign direct investment; strategies appropriate to managing an international business; global environmental issues; and the importance of culture and ethics in international business.  Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.
Richard Johnson | 3 UG credits

ISBU | ISSS 3880: Data Analytics and Decision Making
Online Asynchronous | Available Jan 17-May 1
Introduces the analytics process from question formulation to data gathering, processing, and decision making; highlights and explores differences among methods using large data sets, and case studies from various industries to illustrate and understand concepts. Utilizes statistical software; applies analytical methods through exercises, case study examination, and a final project. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required.
Mary Dunaway | 3 UG credits

ISBU | ISSS 3888: Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today’s liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society.  Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.
Yitna Firdyiwek | 3 UG credits

ISBU | ISSS 4670: Organizational Change and Development
Richmond | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1 | In person class dates: 1/23, 3/13 & 4/24.  All other sessions held synchronously online.
OR
TCC Virginia Beach | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26 | In person class dates: 1/18, 3/15 & 4/19. All other sessions held synchronously online.

This course is designed to equip anyone who has a role to play in organizational change (employees and associates at all levels, supervisors and managers, information technology consultants, and a variety of organizational stakeholders) with the basic tools required to analyze change and its consequences
Mary Repass | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3061: Sacred Paths: Introduction to World Religions
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Introduces six major religious traditions deeply rooted in different cultures including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Examines the historical evolution, the doctrines, beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions.
Luke Wright | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3183: Writing the Story of Your Life:  Creative Nonfiction
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
Student learns how to bring together the imaginative strategies of fictional story telling with new ways of narrating true, real-life events. Explores how Creative Nonfiction writing allows you to share your stories in compelling ways, helps you write effectively in professional and personal situations, and provides new ways for you to document real-life experiences as they occurred.
Karen Hufford | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3190: Writing for Your Life
NVCC Loudoun | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25 | In person class dates: 1/17, 3/14 & 4/25.  All other sessions held synchronously online.
This course gives students a general overview of prose writing and teaches them strategies of rhetoric and composition for their own work.  The course has four components, given approximately equal portions of the semester: (1) the personal essay and fiction, (2) professional writing, (3) research and journalism, and (4) opinion/analysis.  Each reading assignment has a companion writing assignment, which will be critiqued and edited by peer students and by the instructor.
TBD | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3621: The Biological Basis for Art
NVCC Alexandria | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26 | In person class dates: 1/18, 3/15 & 4/26. All other sessions held synchronously online.
Investigates the idea of approaching art as a form of human evolution.  Examines the art of several past and present cultures. Blends art and science to connect aesthetics to an understanding of human nature from the cognitive and biological sciences.  Examines existing personal and cultural theories of art and art criticism.
George Andrews | 3 UG credits

ISHU 4120: The American Short Story: The Writer and Tradition
TCC Virginia Beach | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
OR
Charlottesville | Mondays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 22-Apr 30

This course examines the American short story from the perspective of the both reader and writer. Defining recurrent themes and conventions of the genre by reading major stories spanning the last 200 years of American literature, students explore the importance of tradition to the writer analytically in critical essays and experientially in their own short stories.
David Horton | TCC Virginia Beach | 3 UG credits
Kenny Marotta | Charlottesville | 3 UG credits


ISHU 4130: Film Noir
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Focuses on the genre of film noir, styles noir has brought into mainstream cinema, themes, and characters throughout the genre. Includes class, gender, and the historical context of noir.
George Andrews | 3 UG credits

ISHU 4190: Writing Strategies
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Explores non-fiction writing. Develops and hones skills needed to write stories and essays that readers are compelled to read. Learn the power of personal narrative and begin to grasp how that power affects a reader by understanding the difference between ‘telling’ and ‘showing’.
Robert Henry | 3 UG credits

ISHU 4870: Modern American Culture War
TCC Virginia Beach | Mondays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 22-Apr 30
Examines the phenomenon of American culture wars, those clashes of viewpoints that occur in several areas including education, politics, morality, religion, gender, race, science and society. Studies how these wars arose, who are involved, and how they affect American life both historically and in the present. Involves high-level thinking and discussion about social movements and upheavals, revolts and societal evolution.
Clair Berube | 3 UG credits

ISIN 4510: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Social Sciences - Introduction to European Studies
NVCC Loudoun | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1 | In person class dates: 1/23, 4/3 & 5/1.  All other sessions held synchronously online.
Explores several centuries of European history and traditions through different social scientific approaches including demography and ethnicity, politics, economics, and law. Provides background for understanding major developments (the welfare state, end of empire, Cold War, migration, and the EU) in European civilization in the 20th and 21st centuries
Richard Floyd | 3 UG credits

ISIN 4510: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Social Sciences - Exploring the Social Sciences
Online Synchronous | Mondays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 22-Apr 30
Introduces students to methodologies, content areas, and contributions of social sciences. Provides students with framework for studying and articulating arguments in the social sciences. Students learn similarities among social science disciplines and what differentiates them from the humanities and sciences.
Ann Plunkett | 3 UG credits

ISIN 4520: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Humanities - God and Darwin: Friends or Foes?
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Studies scientists’ and philosophers’ rigorous arguments that God and Darwin are logically irreconcilable, that the idea of a world-creating monotheistic god is mutually exclusive with the idea of evolution by natural selection. Discusses the fact that other scientists and philosophers have argued God and Darwin are complementary, that they in no real sense conflict at all.
Luke Wright | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3040: Decision Making in Public Organizations
Charlottesville | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
This course addresses the question of how organizations actually make decisions and what analysis techniques the organizations use to arrive at a chosen option. The course combines the theory of decision making with actual case studies. Student or team projects allow the student to demonstrate an understanding of the analysis that goes into making a decision. Students will be allowed to choose a decision of national, state, or local interest involving either a government entity or a non-governmental organization with public responsibilities.
John Mirabella | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3210: The Frost is Hard-Edged and Quick: Metaphor - Making a Final Unity
Richmond | Mondays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 22-Apr 30| In person class dates: 1/22, 3/12 & 4/30.  All other sessions held synchronously online.
What is a metaphor? What role does it play in the way we see the world, ourselves and others? What metaphors guide our own thinking - as a society and a culture about politics, crime, illness, ourselves, love and life?  If we take metaphor seriously, is it possible to draw a hard line between fact and fiction, between arts and sciences, between the objective and subjective?  Does metaphor refute reason?  In this course students investigate these and related questions using a variety of media. Texts will be drawn from a spectrum of disciplines including poetry, cognitive psychology, linguistics, philosophy, literature and literary criticism. 
Charlotte Matthews | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3620: Ritual and Becoming in the Arts of Africa
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Examines the traditional arts produced on the African continent such as painting, sculpture, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, and body modification as they are incorporated into age-grade initiation, fertility ceremonies and curative rituals.
Julia May | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3780: An Examination of the Criminal Justice System
NVCC Alexandria | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Provides students with an overview and understanding of the criminal justice system as a social institution inside of the American institution.  Enables students to gain an understanding of the various components of the criminal justice system and its responsibilities to include courts, corrections, and law enforcements.
Alan Rasmussen | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3160: Democracy in America
NVCC Loudoun | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
Examines democracy, free speech, elections and the press; considers the role of a free press in a time of civil discord, challenges to free speech in America at large and on college campuses; evaluates threats to democracy and the electoral process by analyzing Russian hacking and the role of PACs and Super PACs; examines mainstream and social media, “fake news" and posits if democacy can survive in a culture of 24/7 news coverage and "tweets."
Robert Guttman | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3262: Globalization, Liberalism, and Reform in the 19th Century
Online Synchronous | Mondays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 22-Apr 30
Surveys major trends in 19 century world history.  Explores a representative sample of peoples and cultures of the period. Considers how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations.  Introduces students to theoretical frameworks for world and comparative history.  Explores the processes of cultural interaction and globalization. Introduces students to a broad range of sources.
Richard Floyd | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3401: Smart Cities Enabling Sustainability
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Introduces smart cities within the context of sustainability: economic, environmental, and equity. Provides a multidisciplinary look at innovative smart city approaches to solve complex problems on the local level with global impact; includes topics from environmental studies, information technology, data science, engineering, & social science.
Angela Orebaugh | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3411: Introduction to Personality Psychology
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
Explores major theoretical approaches to understanding personality and interpersonal functioning.  Discusses psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, humanistic, and cognitive approaches.
Fan Gao | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3830: Critical Issues in American Foreign Policy
Online Asynchronous | Available Jan 17-May 1
Examines the critical foreign policy challenges facing the United States in the 21st century.  Explores the principal challenges and opportunities for American policymakers, such as: the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental issues, and human rights and democratization.
Peter Ronayne | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4005: Irregular Warfare: Terrorists, Insurgents, and Transnational Criminals
Charlottesville | Tuesdays, 4-6:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Examines the evolution of insurgency, counterinsurgency, and terrorism. Studies readings from Mao Zedong, David Galula, Roger Trinquier, Abu Musab al-Suri and others.  Explores the risk factors that lead to the onset of insurgencies, terrorist movements, and transnational criminal groups and the strategic and ethical challenges states face in countering these types of non-state actors.
Sean Edwards | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4292: Liberalism and Conservatism in Modern America
NVCC Alexandria | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Examines the fundamental clashes between liberals and conservatives, including how this split in perspectives developed our modern culture. Focuses on a tolerant, open-minded, and balanced investigation that seeks a broader understanding and appreciation of these diverse perspectives.
Robert Guttman | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4454: Emotion, Emotional Intelligence, and Meditation
Charlottesville | Wednesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 17-Apr 25
Examines the neurological basis of emotion and the content of emotional intelligence which includes social competence in relationships, impulse control, empathy and compassion, resilience, motivation, and optimism. Discusses the underlying neurological mechanisms through which mindfulness meditation exerts its impact on emotion regulation and emotional intelligence.
Fan Gao | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4458: The Cold War
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 18-Apr 26
This course examines both Russian and American foreign policy at several critical points during the conflict.  Through major scholarly works, primary documents, films, class discussions, papers, and lectures students will work together to better understand the Cold War and gain a fuller understanding of its political, military, cultural, economic, and ideological impact at home and abroad. The following questions will be explored: 1) How did the Cold War start?; 2) What were some of the important decisions made during the conflict, and why?; 3) Why did the Cold War end the way it did?
Paul Pitman | 3 UG credits


The following Health Care Management (HCM) courses are limited to students completing the HCM concentration within BIS. Students should only register for courses after meeting with their HCM advisor. 

PSHM 4300: Introduction to Population Health: Programs, Policy & Epidemiology
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:30pm | Jan 23-May 1 
Examines health issues from a population health perspective of  policy and programs; introduces students to principles of population health practice with emphasis on history, philosophy and scope. Examines how health care delivery systems, public health agencies and community organizations work together to develop interventions to improve the health outcomes in the various communities they serve.  Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
Rashida Biggs | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4400: Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45pm | Jan 23-May 1
Provides an introduction to the research process for the allied healthcare professional.  The purpose, conduct and evaluation of research will be discussed using examples from the health sciences literature. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess the skills to propose and present a basic health sciences research proposal and critically evaluation the sources and substance of health related sources and literature. Prerequisite: PSHM 3010 and PSHM 3050.
Ana Abad-Jorge | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4700: Economics and Finance of Health Care
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:30pm | Jan 18-Apr 26 | Restricted to BPHM and HCM Concentration Students
Provides basic overview of economic and financial management concepts in health care. Introduces important economic concepts and issues in health care including market factors, production, costs, labor issues, and economic evaluation. Provides an overview of basic financial management principles, capital planning, financial statements, and budgeting in health care organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
Maria Kronenburg | 3 UG credits | Required

HR 4030: Organizational Change and Development
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 17-May 1  | *Synchronous sessions TBD. 
Analysis of the key concepts and theories in organizational behavior and organizational development. Focuses on the student’s development of the diagnostic skills necessary to effectively manage organizational change. Deals with specific issues such as downsizing, up sizing, mergers and acquisitions, and the inclusion of an international workforce into a “new” corporate culture. Prerequisite: HR 4010 or with instructor or program director permission.
David Penkrot | 3 UG credits | Elective

IT 3220: Strategic Business Value of Information Technology
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 17-May 1 | *Synchronous Sessions, Thursdays 7-8pm.
Focuses on how to assess the value of IT investments and align technical strategies with business strategies. Introduces Porter’s Five Forces Model, the value chain, technology payoff metrics, and risk analysis. Explores ways to leverage disruptive technologies for competitive advantage. 
Lisa Wentzel | 3 UG credits | Elective



The following Information Technology (IT) courses are limited to students completing the IT concentration within BIS. Students should only register for courses after meeting with their IT advisor. 

IT 3220: Strategic Business Value of Information Technology
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 17-May 1 | *Synchronous Sessions, Thursdays 7-8pm.
Focuses on how to assess the value of IT investments and align technical strategies with business strategies. Introduces Porter’s Five Forces Model, the value chain, technology payoff metrics, and risk analysis. Explores ways to leverage disruptive technologies for competitive advantage. 
Lisa Wentzel | 3 UG credits | Required

IT 3240: Enterprise Systems Architecture and Design
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 17-May 1 | *Synchronous Sessions, TBD.
Applies common frameworks and methodologies to the examination of enterprise system architecture needs.  Includes coverage of the systems development life cycle and the methodologies in use characterized by their varying degrees of iteration, structure, and user involvement. Emphasizes analytical and design concepts and related tools such as use cases and Unified Modeling Language. 
Donald Chisholm | 3 UG credits | Required

IT 4400: Web Application Development - Building Dynamic Websites
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 17-May 1 | Synchronous Sessions, Thursdays 7-8pm.
This course serves as a capstone course to be taken after all other required courses in the program.  Using a project-based approach, students will develop Web applications using the PHP scripting language and MySQL databases. Topics include PHP scripting, data-driven interactivity, writing secure PHP programs, and code frameworks.
Michael Vito | 3 UG credits | Required