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Current Term Classes - BPHM

 

Spring 2020

Class registration opens on December 2. Registration in BPHM classes is open to students enrolled in the degree program. Others may register with program permission as  Community Scholars.  

The School of Continuing and Professional Studies may cancel, modify, or make substitutions for any published class or program, may change instructors, and may change the dates and times a class is offered. The information published here and in the catalog is subject to change. For the most up-to-date and complete information, please use the SIS Class Search

PSHM 4300: Introduction to Population Health: Programs, Policy & Epidemiology
Online Synchronous | Mondays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 13 - Apr 27 | No class on Jan 20, Mar 9 | Restricted to BPHM students 
Examines health issues from a population health perspective of policy and programs; introduces students to principles of population health practice with emphasis on history, philosophy and scope. Examines how health care delivery systems, public health agencies and community organizations work together to develop interventions to improve the health outcomes in the various communities they serve. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
Maria Kronenburg | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4400: Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences 
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10 | Restricted to BPHM students 
Provides an intro to the research process for the allied healthcare professional. The purpose, conduct and eval. of research will be discussed using examples from the health sciences literature. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess the skills to propose and present a basic health sciences research proposal and critically eval. the sources and substance of health related sources and literature. Prereq: PSHM 3010 & PSHM 3050
Maria Kronenburg | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4600: Service Excellence in Health Care: Quality Improvement & Customer Service
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10 | Restricted to BPHM and BIS students
Explores the concepts and organizational factors that impact service delivery and quality in health care. It emphasizes service excellence and resources to improve customer service and quality of services. It will also focus on the concepts, theories, practices, tools, and strategies for quality improvement and quality management in health care organizations and in service delivery. Prerequisite: Completion of PSHM 3010
Mark Erath | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4700: Economics and Finance of Health Care
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11 | Restricted to BPHM and BIS students
Provides basic overview of economic and financial management concepts in health care. Introduces important economic concepts and issues in health care including market factors, production, costs, labor issues, and economic evaluation. Provides an overview of basic financial management principles, capital planning, financial statements, and budgeting in health care organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.
Mark Erath | 3 UG credits | Required

PSHM 4950: Capstone II: Health Sciences Management Project Implementation
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 16 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 12 | Restricted to BPHM students
Focuses on the successful completion of the student’s capstone project proposed in PSHM 4900 Capstone Course I. Integrates the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in the BPHM degree program and applies them to a problem or opportunity for improvement in the healthcare management field. Students conduct a project in a real world healthcare management setting. Prerequisite: PSHM 4900.
Maria Kronenburg | 3 UG credits | Required

ACCT 2010: Introductory Accounting I
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 13 - Apr 28 | Synchronous sessions TBD.
Designed to introduce students to the language of business, the course begins with the role of financial data in contemporary society, proceeds to develop the accounting model for capturing financial data, and finishes with the problems of measuring and reporting income, assets, liabilities, and equities.
Marshall Kasten | 3 UG credits | Advance Restrictive Elective in BPHM

IT 3220: Strategic Business Value of Information Technology
Online Asynchronous | Available Jan 13 - Apr 28 | Optional synchronous sessions on Thursdays, 7-8:30 pm
Focuses on how to assess the value of IT investments and align technical strategies with business strategies. Introduces Porter’s Five Forces Model, the value chain, technology payoff metrics, and risk analysis. Explores ways to leverage disruptive technologies for competitive advantage.
Lisa Wentzel | 3 UG credits | Advance Restrictive Elective in BPHM

BPHM students may take online BIS courses to meet their general education requirements in Humanities and Social Sciences:

ISBU 4670: Organizational Change and Development
Online Synchronous | Mondays & Fridays, 12-1:15 pm | Jan 13 - Apr 27 | No class on Jan 20, Mar 9, Mar 13
This course is designed to equip anyone who has a role to play in organizational change (employees and associates at all levels, supervisors and managers, information technology consultants, and a variety of organizational stakeholders) with the basic tools required to analyze change and its consequences.
Mary Repass | 3 UG credits

ISBU 3888: Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 16 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 12
Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today’s liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society. Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.
Yitna Benyam Firdyiwek | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3061: Sacred Paths: Introduction to World Religions
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11
Introduces six major religious traditions deeply rooted in different cultures including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Examines the historical evolution, the doctrines, beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions.
Luke Savin Herrick Wright | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3453: Food for Thought: An Exploration of the Way We Eat
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10
Looks at ways food has influenced western culture, and its significance in our lives from the invention of agriculture to the contemporary debate about health foods; examines films and texts to find woman’s role in food production, how religious beliefs, economic factors, and ideas about health influence why and what we eat. Should we live to eat or eat to live? Where do we eat? What forces shape our choice of foods? That’s plenty to chew on!
Virginia Ruth Mosser | 3 UG credits

ISHU 3456: History of Western Architecture from Antiquity to the Present
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays & Thursdays, 12-1:15 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 10, 12
Examines the tradition of Western architecture from its inception in Greece and Rome to the present. Focuses on aesthetic, cultural, and political ideas framing the design, uses, and meanings of these celebrated buildings. Provides tools for visual analysis using a variety of methods from text analysis to visits of buildings.
Julia May | 3 UG credits

ISHU 4180: The Nature of the Hero and How to Create One
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 16 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 12
Focuses on plot, point of view, discovery of theme, recognition and reversal, and writing in scene, for writers of fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and memoir. Creates an understanding of how stories are shaped and told. Explores Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey, which distills the stories told in every culture into a framework for one’s own story.
Robert Henry | 3 UG credits

ISIN 4510: Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Social Sciences: Historical Study of the Sociology of Empire
Online Asynchronous* | Available Jan 13 - Apr 28
Explores the marvelous world depicted in Kipling’s Indian Tales from the perspective of the commentary they provide on British expatriate society. Discusses how Kipling has often been viewed as a critic of Indian society, when in fact he is critical of the British. Examines the work of Clifford Geertz and other anthropologists to provide a rounded picture of Kipling as an analyst of cultural systems.
Luke Savin Herrick Wright| 3 UG credits
 
ISLS 3000: Transformations: Reading, Thinking, and Communicating in the Liberal Arts
Online Synchronous | Mondays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 13 - Apr 27 | No class on Jan 20, Mar 9 | Restricted to BIS students
Develops reading, writing, critical thinking, technology and research proficiencies necessary for success at college level and beyond; orients students to the culture of the University and the community of the BIS program. Introduces the breadth of campus resources and addresses academic advising; utilizes the theme of transformation as subject matter for reading, writing and discussion to provide opportunities for multi-disciplinary exploration.
Charlotte Hilary Matthews | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3000: Transformations: Reading, Thinking, and Communicating in the Liberal Arts
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11 | Restricted to BIS students
Develops reading, writing, critical thinking, technology and research proficiencies necessary for success at college level and beyond; orients students to the culture of the University and the community of the BIS program. Introduces the breadth of campus resources and addresses academic advising; utilizes the theme of transformation as subject matter for reading, writing and discussion to provide opportunities for multi-disciplinary exploration.
Charlotte Hilary Matthews | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3210: The Frost is Hard-Edged and Quick: Metaphor - Making a Final Unity
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10
What is a metaphor? What role does it play in the way we see the world, ourselves and others? What metaphors guide our own thinking - as a society and a culture about politics, crime, illness, ourselves, love and life? If we take metaphor seriously, is it possible to draw a hard line between fact and fiction, between arts and sciences, between the objective and subjective? Does metaphor refute reason? In this course students investigate these and related questions using a variety of media. Texts will be drawn from a spectrum of disciplines including poetry, cognitive psychology, linguistics, philosophy, literature and literary criticism.
Charlotte Hilary Matthews | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3610: Renaissance Art
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11
Explores Renaissance art in Europe beginning in the 13th century and continuing through the first decades of the 16th century. Considers materials, techniques, the aims of art-making, and artistic training. Examines through an evaluation of period texts the revival of Classicism in European art, architecture, and philosophy as well as the dynamics between artists, patrons, and institutions.
Julia May | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3780: An Examination of the Criminal Justice System
Online Synchronous | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11
Provides students with an overview and understanding of the criminal justice system as a social institution inside of the American institution. Enables students to gain an understanding of the various components of the criminal justice system and its responsibilities to include courts, corrections, and law enforcements.
Allen Rasmussen | 3 UG credits

ISLS 3780: An Examination of the Criminal Justice System
NVCC Alexandria | Wednesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 15 - Apr 22 | No class on Mar 11
Provides students with an overview and understanding of the criminal justice system as a social institution inside of the American institution. Enables students to gain an understanding of the various components of the criminal justice system and its responsibilities to include courts, corrections, and law enforcements.
Allen Rasmussen | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3401: Smart Cities Sustainability
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10
Introduces smart cities within the context of sustainability: economic, environmental, and equity. Provides a multidisciplinary look at innovative smart city approaches to solve complex problems on the local level with global impact; includes topics from environmental studies, information technology, data science, engineering, and social science.
Angela Orebaugh | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3453: Food for Thought: An Exploration of the Way We Eat
Online Synchronous | Tuesdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 14 - Apr 28 | No class on Mar 10
Looks at ways food has influenced western culture, and its significance in our lives from the invention of agriculture to the contemporary debate about health foods; examines films and texts to find woman’s role in food production, how religious beliefs, economic factors, and ideas about health influence why and what we eat. Should we live to eat or eat to live? Where do we eat? What forces shape our choice of foods? That’s plenty to chew on!
Virginia Ruth Mosser | 3 UG credits

ISSS 3888: Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 16 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 12
Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today’s liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society. Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.
Yitna Benyam Firdyiwek | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4000: The Experience of the Great War: Life and Literature
Online Synchronous | Mondays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 13 - Apr 27 | No class on Jan 20, Mar 9
Drawing on histories and literature, including autobiographies, poetry, and novels, this course focuses on the experiences and mentalities of those who fought in World War I, as well as those who remained on the home front. The realities and myths of the Great War are explored. An emphasis is placed on British, French, and German writings about the Western Front as well as some consideration of the fighting on the Eastern Front and in Turkey.
Ann Marie Harkins Plunkett | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4455: Social Inequality
Online Synchronous | Thursdays, 7-9:45 pm | Jan 16 - Apr 23 | No class on Mar 12
This course explores systems of social inequality: feudalism, caste and slavery, class, and status groups, primarily in American society, but with reference to Europe and the Indian sub-continent as well. Starting with the fundamental concepts of Karl Marx and Max Weber, students will discuss the theoretical constructs that define systems of inequality, consider some historical examples, and then examine “social stratification” in our own country. Does the United States have a class system? If so, what are its characteristics? Joining the scholarly debate on this issue, students will consider the meaning of equal opportunity and social mobility for achieving the “American dream.” The course also explores the empirical consequences of social inequality for every day life: in health and wellness, housing, education, and family structure.
Claire Berube | 3 UG credits

ISSS 4670: Organizational Change and Development
Online Synchronous | Mondays & Fridays, 12-1:15 pm | Jan 13 - Apr 27 | No class on Jan 20, Mar 9, 13
Explores system theories, organizational structure and design, organizational culture, organizational diagnosis, and several basic frames of reference for understanding change.
Mary Repass | 3 UG credits


*Asynchronous online courses at SCPS can sometimes include synchronous sessions. Attendance is strongly encouraged but not mandatory at synchronous sessions. They will be recorded for those unable to attend a synchronous meeting for viewing at a later time.

* The information contained on this website is for informational purposes only. The Undergraduate Record and Graduate Record represent the official repository for academic program requirements.

Faculty Spotlight

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My own experience confirms my belief in the importance of education and lifelong learning. I know what it's like to take courses online and to make sacrifices to devote myself to my studies. But I also know the kind of opportunities education opens up.
A photograph of Ana Abad-Jorge

Ana Abad-Jorge

Bachelor of Professional Studies in Health Sciences Management & Certificate in Health Sciences Management

After 27 years spent working with the most vulnerable of patients as a pediatric nutritionist with the UVA Health System, Ana decided to pursue her lifelong goal of teaching. She earned her doctorate in higher education and adult learning, and is now program director and assistant professor for the Bachelor of Professional Studies in Health Sciences Management and Certificate in Health Sciences Management programs.

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Student Spotlight

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The faculty are deeply engaged on an everyday basis with their students. And interacting with classmates working in different parts of health care was eye-opening.
A photograph of Jackie Maier

Jackie Maier

BACHELOR OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES IN HEALTH SCIENCES MANAGEMENT

Like many SCPS students, Jackie saw her path to promotion blocked by the absence of a four-year degree on her resumé. As a licensed physical therapist assistant, she found that the health sciences program was a perfect fit for her interests and career aspirations. She was able to transfer credits earned in her applied science associate’s degree program, and is now well on her way to assuming a management role in her field.

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University of Virginia School of Continuing and Professional Studies
104 Midmont Lane PO Box 400764, Charlottesville, VA 22904